Family & Consumer Science


Adult Roles & Responsibilities, 1 semester, 1 credit
Grade 12
This class builds knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors students will need as they prepare to take the next steps toward adulthood. The focus is on becoming independent, contributing, and responsible participants in family, community, and career settings. Topics include:  Inter personal standards, lifespan rolls and responsibilities, individual and family resource management, and financial responsibility and resources.

Child Development, 1 semester, 1 credit
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
This class addresses the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors associated with supporting the growth and development of infants and toddlers. A project-based approach utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes. The focus is on research-based nurturing and parenting practices and skills. Topics include the roles, responsibilities and challenges of parenthood; human sexuality; adolescent pregnancy; prenatal development; preparation for birth and the birth process; meeting the needs of infants and toddlers; impacts of heredity and environment on development of the child; parental resources, services, and agencies; and career awareness. Note: Supplemental materials may be required to be purchased.

Advanced Child Development, 1 semester, 1 credit
Grades 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Child Development
This is a sequential course that addresses more complex issues of child development and early childhood education with emphasis on guiding physical, social, emotional, intellectual, moral, and cultural development throughout childhood, including preschool age children and middle childhood. Topics include positive parenting and nurturing across ages and stages; practices that promote long-term well-being of children and their families; developmentally appropriate guidance and intervention strategies with individuals and groups of children.

Advanced Child Development II, 1 semester, 1 credit
Grades 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Advanced Child Development
This is a sequential course that addresses more complex issues of child development and early childhood education with emphasis on guiding physical, social, emotional, intellectual, moral, and cultural development throughout childhood, including school age children and teens. Topics include positive parenting and nurturing across ages and stages; practices that promote long-term well-being of children and their families; developmentally appropriate guidance and intervention strategies with individuals and groups of children.Students will access, evaluate, and utilize information to meet needs of children, including children with a variety of disadvantaging conditions. Students will explore all aspects of the industry for selected child-related careers. Authentic applications are required through school-based experiences. 

Housing and Interiors Design & Foundations, 1 semester, 1 credit
Grades 10, 11, 12
This class addresses selecting and planning living environments to meet the needs and wants of individuals and families throughout the family life cycle. Economic, social, cultural, technological, environmental, maintenance, and aesthetic factors are considered. Topics include housing styles, locations, zones, restrictions, and ownership options; managing resources to provide shelter; contemporary housing issues, environmental and energy issues; impacts of technology; housing to meet special needs; elements and principles of design related to interiors, housing, and architecture; creating functional, safe, and aesthetic spaces; historical aspects and contemporary trends in housing, interiors, furniture, and appliances; exploration of housing-related careers. A project consisting of a color board and notebook that includes designing a kitchen and bathroom, arranging furniture, choosing color schemes, drawing a floor plan, traffic patterns, and samples of furniture, wall, and floor coverings must be completed in order to receive credit. This course is recommended for any student for enrichment and as a foundation for students with interests in any career or profession related to housing, interiors, and furnishings.

Human Development and Family Wellness, 1 semester, 1 credit
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
This class addresses development and wellness of individuals and families throughout the life cycle. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study of individual and family issues. Topics include human development and wellness theories, principles, and practices; roles, responsibilities, and functions of families and family members throughout the life cycle; individual and family wellness planning; prevention and management of illnesses and disease; impacts of diverse perspectives, needs, and characteristics on human development and family wellness; gerontology and intergenerational aspects.

Interpersonal Relationships, 1 semester, 1 credit
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
This class addresses the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors all students need to participate in positive, caring, and respectful relationships in the family and with individuals at school, in the community, and in the workplace. Topics include components of healthy relationships, roles and responsibilities in relationships; ethics in relationships; factors that impact relationships (e.g., power, conflicting interests, peer pressure, life events); establishing and maintaining relationships; building self-esteem and self-image through healthy relationships; communications styles; techniques for effective communication, individual and group goal setting and decision making; preventing and managing stress and conflict and addressing violence and abuse. A project covering one of the units above is required to earn credit in this class. This class includes basic people skills that could benefit anyone in any career.

Nutrition & Wellness, 1 semester, 1 credit
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
Students will learn nutrition theory and lifelong benefits of sound nutrition and wellness practices in a project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking. Topics include impact of daily nutrition and wellness practices on long-term physical, social, and psychological health. This includes planning for fitness, selection and preparation of nutritious meals and snacks based on USDA Dietary Guidelines, food safety, sanitation, storage, and recycling processes. The main emphasis in this class is on nutrition theory, not food preparation. This course is recommended for all students regardless of their career cluster or pathway. A student must maintain a "C"average in the class in order to participate in lab experiences.

Advanced Nutrition Wellness, 1 semester, 1 credit
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Nutrition and Wellness
This is a sequential course that builds on concepts from NUTRITION AND WELLNESS and will enable students to develop the ability to have a positive impact on their own health and wellness and long-term quality of life, and to meet the nutrition and foods needs of themselves and their families. They will increase skills in planning for better uses of their own and other resources in family, community, and/or career settings. Higher order thinking, communication, leadership and management processes will be integrated in classroom and laboratory activities.

Advanced Nutrition and Wellness II, 1 semester, 1 credit
Grades 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Nutrition and Wellness and Advanced Nutrition and Foods 1
This is a sequential course that builds on concepts from NUTRITION AND WELLNESS and Advanced NUTRITION AND FOODS 1. This course addresses more complex concepts in food preparation, with emphasis on contemporary issues, and on advanced special topics such as International, Regional, and/or Cultural Foods; Food Science, and Nutrition. Multiple perspectives, and practices, such as cultural diversity and needs of special populations, will be explored. Higher order thinking, communication, leadership and management processes will be integrated in classroom and laboratory activities.

Introduction to Fashion and Textiles I, 1 semester, 1 credit
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
This course introduces students to the World of Fashion. This course is for career oriented students. Units covered include Fashion Style Terminology, Elements and Principles of Design, Textiles, and Careers in Fashion.Research a famous designer and present the information to the class. Students must complete assigned projects and learn basic alteration skills. Note: Supplemental materials may be required to be purchased.

Introduction to Fashion and Textiles II, 1 semester, 1 credit
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Fashion and Textiles Foundations 1
This course addresses knowledge and skills related to design, production, acquisition, and distribution in fashion and textiles arenas. Topics include exploration of textiles and fashion industries; elements of science and design in textiles and apparel; textiles principles and applications; social, psychological, cultural and environmental aspects of clothing and textiles selection; clothing and textile products for people with special needs; critical thinking applied to consumer options for fashion, textiles, and related equipment and tools; care and maintenance of textile products, equipment, and tools; impacts of technology; construction and alteration skills; contemporary issues, including global applications. Portfolio activities are required.
Note: Supplemental materials may be required to be purchased.