World Languages

WORLD LANGUAGES

The study of a foreign language is preparation not only for college but also for future employment and world travel. Your teacher will expect you to understand, to speak, to read and to write in the foreign language. You will also study the culture of the foreign countries. You will be assigned written homework, oral presentations, and projects. Nightly review is expected of all foreign-language students to ensure their success. College-bound students are reminded that you will be required to take a foreign language placement test as you enter the university. Students who have done well in upper level high school classes (usually IV or V) can expect to test out of some credit in college which will save them time and money on their degree program. To maintain your foreign language skills, you should sign up for at least two semesters each school year whenever possible. General Prerequisite for French, German, Latin and Spanish, all levels: A minimum GPA of 2.0 is highly recommended at the end of each term to continue in these classes. In order to proceed to second, third and fourth levels, student must have teacher's signature. All freshmen must have a C (2.0) in English to take a foreign language.


 
NOTE: To shortcut to the course information for a specific curriculum, click on the subject link below.
 
 
 
FRENCH  

French 1, 2 semesters, 2 credits
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
Our French courses use videos and audio as well as texts to focus on language that is used in the lives of real French-speaking people. Students will practice orally as well as in writing how to respond to and give oral directions, make requests (such as ordering food and drinks in a cafe), and telling about daily routines and events. They will ask and answer simple questions in order to participate in guided conversations, read words and phrases in texts such as signs, menus, and schedules, follow basic written instructions, learn to comprehend short texts on simple subjects, and write familiar words, phrases, and simple responses. In addition, students will learn about cultural aspects of France, Quebec, and Cote d'Ivoire (formerly known as Ivory Coast), and Martinique, such as typical activities for teenagers in these countries (high school, sports, shopping), nonverbal communication, holidays, geographical features of France, and appropriate greeting, leave-taking, and courteous responses. In the second semester, students ask questions about every day activities, participate in longer conversations on a variety of topics, relate experiences, ask for and grant permission, help, or information and express preferences.
           

French 2, 2 semesters, 2 credits
Grades 11, 12
Prerequisite: French 1
We continue our focus on real-life French. We begin by visiting Paris again, and then move on to the chateau region of France. Conversational topics include talking about feelings, expressing satisfaction and frustration, sympathizing with someone, giving reasons for your actions, doubting something, and asking for information. Students will learn to respond and participate appropriately and creatively in various social situations, family celebrations, and crisis situations. Students will gain practice reading authentic materials from popular media and traditional literature. They will complete authentic forms and taken notes using familiar vocabulary and structures. They will also be able to write brief compositions and summaries. Students will describe aspects of French culture, using French where appropriate and almost exclusively in the classroom.
Note: A French-English/English-French dictionary is recommended

French 3, 2 semesters, 2 credits *
Grades 11, 12
Prerequisite: French 2; teacher's signature required.
In this course, students visit French-speaking Europe, Africa, and America to learn about the various ways French is spoken around the world. Focus is almost exclusively on communication, and students are expected to speak French only in the classroom. They begin the year by talking about what their summer vacations were like and asking and answering questions with their classmates. They will be able to ask for and give directions, express impatience, reassure someone, express enthusiasm, and ask and tell where things are. In addition, they will take on the role of the parent by granting and refusing permission, expressing obligation, forbidding, reproaching, and justifying actions. In this course, students also learn to speak in the future about their plans and write a formal letter to a business or perspective employer. Students will also learn the subjunctive mood, so they will be able to express doubt, make suppositions, express astonishment, fear, relief, and caution someone. Much of the course is spent on learning about the culture of the French-speaking world, making comparisons among cultures, and explaining differences. At this level students also begin a more serious and in-depth study of Francophone literature.
*Dual Credit:    this course is offered for dual credit through PNC.  Students may receive 3 college credits per semester.

French 4 Honors, 2 semesters, 2 credits *
Grades 11, 12
Prerequisite French 3; teacher's signature required
In this course, students spend the year communicating exclusively in French. They read authentic literature from the French-speaking world, and then discuss plot, story details, and structure with the class. They evaluate works of literature and debate in French about the quality of pieces they read. Students discover the world of French art, focusing on 19th and 20th century French works, and speak and write about their feelings on chosen pieces of art. Students also study a unit on music from France and the French-speaking world. All of the functions studied and practiced in French 1 3 are worked on and perfected at this level. Assessments are authentic, as the level of the course is more rigorous. French IV Honors students are expected to write and speak French throughout the class, using the language to discuss questions in understanding, support their opinions, and relate past experiences as well as future plans and hopes. They will write impromptu compositions and give impromptu speeches in which they support their opinions on a given topic. They will use authentic sources, such as French sites on the Internet, to research and report on topics in French culture, history, and current events.
*Dual Credit:    This course is offered for dual credit through PNC.  Students may receive 3 college credits per semester. 
Note:  A French-English dictionary is required.
 
 
GERMAN  

German 1, 2 semesters, 2 credits
Grades 9, 10, 11

German 1 introduces many expressions and focuses on vocabulary and grammar for everyday life situations. Students have many opportunities to speak and listen to spoken German before beginning to read and write it. They will practice responding to and giving oral directions, making requests, and telling about daily routines and events. Students will also ask and answer simple questions to participate in guided conversations, read words and phrases in texts such as signs, menus, and schedules, follow basic written instructions, learn to comprehend short texts on simple topics, and write familiar words, phrases, and simple responses. The culture of everyday life is emphasized so that students are able to travel to German-speaking countries. Students will learn about nonverbal communication, holidays, and appropriate greetings, leave taking, and courteous responses. Popular tourist destinations are highlighted, and students become familiar with both the geography of the German-speaking countries and the way of life in these lands.
 
German 2, 2 semesters, 2 credits
Grades 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: German 1
German 2 prepares students for a short stay with a German family.  More of the class is taught in German. Through this course, students are able to ask questions about everyday activities, participate in various topics of conversation, relate simple experiences, interact in situations in which someone asks for permission, help or information, and express preferences. Emphasis is still on listening and speaking, but students begin to read longer selections and spend more time writing their opinions and reactions to these topics. They will also read aloud with appropriate pronunciation and intonation, and write brief situational responses, such as notes, directions, and letters. Significant historical events in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland are highlighted, as well as geographical features, historical events, and political structures. Students will become familiar with traditions in art, architecture, literature, and music, and will learn about acting as a host or guest and dealing with time expectations and appointments.
Note: 1 workbook required; German-English dictionary is required

German 3, 2 semesters, 2 credits
Grades 11, 12
Prerequisite: German 2
This course is a bridge to the advanced, topic-oriented courses offered to students beyond the intermediate level. Most of the class is taught in German. German III introduces students to the arts, literature, and current topics of the German speaking countries. This course continues to expand students ability to carry on a conversation in a variety of settings and to respond and participate appropriately in various social situations, family celebrations, and crisis situations. Students will gain practice reading authentic materials from popular media (such as JUMA, a German teen magazine) and traditional literature. They will complete authentic forms and take notes using familiar vocabulary and structures. They will also be able to write brief compositions and summaries. Students will describe aspects of German culture, using German where appropriate.  The Berlin Wall will be studied in depth through film readings and video clips.  Students will also read original German fairy tales and film their won fairy tale.  Austria will be a cultural focus in the classroom.  Germany's successful recycling system will also be studied and discussed in depth.
Note: 1 workbook required; German-English dictionary is required

German 4 AP, 2 semesters, 2 credits
Grades 11, 12
Prerequisite:  German 3 and honors criteria.
This course will emphasize German as it is spoken in real life situations. German IV Honors students are expected to write and speak German throughout the class, using the language to discuss questions in understanding, support their opinions, and relate past experiences as well as future plans and hopes. Students in German IV Honors can participate in a variety of situations in the culture, and can adjust their speech according to the demands of the situation or audience. Students in German IV will give presentations on cultural topics. They will be able to paraphrase or restate what someone else has said. They will read variety of authentic materials, including full magazine articles, essays, and traditional literature. Students in this Honors level course comprehend, summarize and discuss brief readings from the following topics: Fairy tales and sagas, mysteries, German films and web sites, short stories by modern authors, German for business use, a review of important language structures, and Century events in the German world. Students in this course have an opportunity to perform familiar fairy tales in German. Students will also practice writing poetry and other creative pieces in the language. They are aware of connections between at least one historical period and its art forms, and of major art forms, musical styles, and literary forms in one of the countries studied. Students will focus on Switzerland and its customs.  Resistance groups during World War II, particularly "The White Rose", will be studied.  The novel, The White Rose will be read in class.  Eric Kastner's "Emil and the Detectives" will also be read.  Students will create  a commercial or infomercial in groups.  Students are expected to speak German 80-90% of the time in the classroom.  AP test preparation materials and methods will also be an ongoing focus throughout the course.  German-English Dictionary is required.
 
 
 
LATIN  

Latin 1, 2 semesters, 2 credits
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
This beginning course introduces students to the principal features of the Latin language. Emphasis is placed not only on word forms and correct usage in sentences. Latin I students learn to respond to and give oral directions and make basic requests, to use courtesy expressions and tell about daily routines, to ask and answer simple questions, to recognize words and phrase in a realistic context (such as signs or menus), and to read orally. They will practice writing words and phrases in guided activities, and can also respond in writing to a question or instructions. Students will learn about our cultural heritage from Rome, and the vast influence of the Latin language on English.

Latin 2, 2 semesters, 2 credits
Grades 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:  Latin 1; teacher's signature required
This intermediate course reviews the vocabulary and structure from Latin I and moves on to the more advanced structures of the language. Students in Latin II will gain practice in asking questions, describing daily routines and personal experiences. They can interact in everyday situations, such as asking for help or permission, and expressing preferences. They can understand main ideas and certain facts from a variety of simple readings. They will read aloud with appropriate intonation and pronunciation. They will also write short messages and more formal letters, as well as guided compositions on familiar topics. Upon completion of the grammar of the language, students are introduced to simple readings that teach the history of Rome and lead into Caesars War Commentaries. A supplemental text, Roman Life, is used as the basis of a deeper knowledge of Roman culture.

Latin 3, 2 semesters, 2 credits
Grades 11, 12
Prerequisite: Latin 2;  teacher's signature required
Students of Latin 3 will respond to a variety of question types, and will be able to restate what someone else has said. Students are encouraged to use the Internet to find information on various aspects of Roman history, literature, and language, and they are able to give short presentations on these cultural topics. They will be introduced to a variety of literary genre, understanding and evaluating what is read. The readings for Latin III are taken from the words of Cicero and Julius Caesar. Additionally, Martials epigrams are used as a preparation for future readings in verse. Students will begin to write creatively, and are also able to write a well-organized composition on a given topic.

Latin AP 4, 2 semesters, 2 credits
Grades 11, 12

Prerequisite: Latin 3 and honors criteria; teacher's signature required
This level of Latin will begin with a systematic review of Latin grammar and continue with more extensive readings. Running concurrently with the review will be readings from Virgils Aeneid, Books, I, II, III, IV, and VI. During the remainder of the course, students will be introduced to the Roman poet Horace. Additionally, each student will be required to read the whole of a translation of the Aeneid during the first term, and selections from Horace during the second. Students will continue to write original prose and poetry, and are also able to write a well-organized composition on a given topic. Students demonstrate a familiarity with classical culture and its contributions to our modern-day culture.
 
 
SPANISH

Spanish 1, 2 semesters, 2 credits
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

In this course you will learn how to ask and answer simple personal questions about yourself and others. Students will practice responding to and giving oral directions, making requests (such as ordering food in a restaurant), telling about daily routines and events, and making plans. They will ask and answer simple questions to participate in guided conversations, read words and phrases in texts such as signs, menus, and schedules, follow basic written instructions, learn to comprehend short texts on simple topics, and write familiar words, phrases, and simple responses. In addition, students will learn about cultural aspects of several Spanish-speaking countries and communities in the United States (such as Mexico, Spain, and Florida, and Ecuador), including nonverbal communication, holidays, geographical features, and appropriate greetings, leave taking, and courteous responses.

Spanish 2, 2 semesters, 2 credits
Grades 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Spanish 1
In this course students will continue to learn the written and spoken forms of Spanish with an opportunity for you to express yourself on a wider range of topics. Students will become familiar with areas of the United States where Spanish is spoken as frequently as English. They will also learn about how to prepare for travel to a Spanish-speaking country. Through this course, students are able to ask questions about everyday activities, participate in various topics of conversation, relate simple experiences, interact in situations in which someone asks for permission, help or information, and express preferences. They will understand readings on familiar topics, read aloud with appropriate pronunciation and intonation, and write brief situational responses, such as notes, directions, and letters. With special focus on Texas, Puerto Rico, and particular regions of Spain and Mexico, students will also examine culture in semesters of geographical features, historical events, and political structures. They will become familiar with traditions in art, architecture, literature, and music, and will learn about everyday life in the Spanish-speaking world.
Spanish 3, 2 semesters, 2 credits *
Grades 11, 12

Prerequisite: Spanish 2; teacher's signature required
This intermediate course will place emphasis on greater use of Spanish in a variety of settings. Students will have opportunities to respond and participate appropriately and creatively in various social situations, family celebrations, and crisis situations. They will gain practice discussing and reacting to news events and environmental issues, recalling childhood memories, and talking about entertainment and recreation. Students will gain practice reading authentic materials from popular media and traditional literature. They will complete authentic forms and take notes using familiar vocabulary and structures. They will also be able to write summaries, reports, and a fairy tale or science fiction story. With special focus on Mexico, the United States, the Caribbean, and the Andean countries of South America, students will use Spanish to describe aspects of the target culture.
*Dual Credit:  This course is offered for dual credit through PNC.  Students may receive 3 college credits per semester.
 
Spanish 4 AP, 2 semesters, 2 credits *
Grades 11, 12

Prerequisite: Spanish 3, honors criteria
Students in Spanish 4 Honors will give presentations on cultural topics. They will be able to paraphrase or restate what someone else has said. They will read literary selections from our textbook (written in Spanish only), and they will frequently practice creative writing in the language. They are aware of connections between at least one historical period and its art forms, and of major art forms, musical styles, and literary forms in one of the countries studied. They can participate in a variety of situations in the culture, and can adjust their speech according to the demands of the situation or audience. A general review of Spanish grammar and the tense system will be embedded in a theme-based curriculum. For their required Honors projects, students will use authentic sources to research and report on topics in Hispanic culture, history and current events. They will view and discuss movies with topics pertaining to the Hispanic culture. Spanish IV Honors students are expected to write and speak Spanish throughout the class, using the language to discuss questions in understanding, support their opinions, and relate past experiences as well as future plans and hopes. They will write impromptu compositions and give impromptu speeches in which they support their opinions on a given topic.
*Dual Credit:  This course is offered for dual credit through PNC.  Students may receive 3 college credits per semester.