Engineering-Technology Education (ETE)

 

Computer Science (PLTW-Project Lead the Way): Course Descriptions:

 


 

Financial Note: Computer Science students are required to pay a lab fee of $15 for each course.

Note: The following courses satisfy many Graduation Pathways requirements and are recommended for students who are interested in pursuing a post-secondary degree or career in Computer Science, Computer Science Engineering or Technology, or Programming.  All courses count as Directed Electives or Electives for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.  AP and Math credit are available through the Computer Science Pathway.  *Students passing the PLTW college portion of the Nation End Course Exam are eligible for trans-scripted college credit.

 


 

*Introduction to Computer Science (PLTW Computer Science Essentials) #4802 AB    2 semesters, 2 credits          

        Grades: 9,10,11,12

 

With emphasis on computational thinking and collaboration, this year-long course provides an excellent entry point for students to begin or continue the PLTW Computer experience. Computer Science Essentials will expose students to a diverse set of computational thinking concepts, fundamentals, and tools, allowing them to gain understanding and build confidence. 

In Computer Science Essentials, students will use visual, block-based programming and seamlessly transition to text-based programming with languages such as Python to create apps and develop websites, and learn how to make computers work together to put their design into practice. They’ll apply computational thinking practices, build their vocabulary, and collaborate just as computing professionals do to create products that address topics and problems important to them.

Computer Science Essentials helps students create a strong foundation to advance to Computer Science Principles 1, AP Computer Science, and beyond.

 


 

*Computer Science 1 (PLTW Computer Science Principles) #4801  2 semesters,2 credit  Grades:10,11,12

Prerequisite: Passed “Introduction to Computer Science”.

 

Using Python® as a primary tool and incorporating multiple platforms and languages for computation, this course aims to develop computational thinking, generate excitement about career paths that utilize computing, and introduce professional tools that foster creativity and collaboration. Computer Science Principles helps students develop programming expertise and explore the workings of the Internet. Students will learn Visual Basic using Visual Studio, which will include algorithm development, flow charting, input/output techniques, looping and modules. Students have an opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment, and will provide an overview of computers and logic, design process, GUI, event driven programs, file handling, and arrays.  Projects and problems include app development, visualization of data, cybersecurity, and simulation.

 


 

*AP Computer Science Principles #4568 2 semesters, 2 credits         Grades: 9,10,11,12

Prerequisite: Incoming 9th graders Passed Alg. 1 with a B.  Or, have completed “Intro to Computer Science”.

 

The AP Computer Science Principles course will introduce students to the essential ideas of computer science and show how computing and technology can influence the world. Students will creatively address real-world issues and concerns while using the same processes and tools as artists, writers, computer scientists, and engineers to bring ideas to life. Topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. Students will complete an AP Computer Science test as part of the course.  Counts as a Math Course for all diplomas.

 


 

 


Computer Science 2 (PLTW Computer Science A)   #5236   2 semesters,  2 credits         Grades: 11,12

Prerequisite: Computer Science 1

 

          Computer Science II: Programming explores and builds skills in programming and a basic understanding of the fundamentals of procedural program development using structured, modular concepts. Coursework emphasizes logical program design involving user-defined functions and standard structure elements. Discussions will include the role of data types, variables, structures, addressable memory locations, arrays and pointers and data file access methods. An emphasis on logical program design using a modular approach, which involves task oriented program functions.  Activities include: collaborating to create original solutions to problems, choosing by designing and implementing user interfaces and Web-based databases, as well as creating a game for their friends or an app to serve a real need in their community. This course is aligned to the AP CSA framework.

PLTW (Project Lead the Way) Bio Medical Course Descriptions

 


 

Financial Note: In addition to normal book rental, students taking PLTW pre-engineering courses will be required to pay a lab fee of $15 for each course.

Note: The following courses satisfy many Graduation Pathways and are recommended for students who are interested in pursuing a post-secondary degree in an engineering, technology or medical field of study. All courses count as Directed Electives or Electives for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas. Students passing the college portion of the Nation End Course Exam are eligible for trans-scripted college credit through many national universities. 

 


 

Principles of Biomedical Sciences (PBS)  #5218AB 2 semesters, 2 credits 9, 10, 11

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA (9th graders), completed or taking concurrently with Biology

In the introductory course of the PLTW Biomedical Science program, students explore concepts of biology and medicine to determine factors that led to the death of a fictional person. While investigating the case, students examine autopsy reports, investigate medical history, and explore medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, basic biology, medicine, and research processes while allowing them to design their own experiments to solve problems.  

 

 


 

Human Body System (HBS)  #5216AB 2 semesters, 2 credits 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Principles of Biomedical Sciences

Students examine the interactions of human body systems as they explore identity, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal Maniken®; use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration; and take on the roles of biomedical professionals to solve real-world medical cases.

 

 


 

Medical Interventions (MI)  #5217AB 2 semesters, 2 credits       11, 12

Prerequisite: Principles of Biomedical Sciences and Human Body Systems

Students follow the life of a fictitious family as they investigate how to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease. Students explore how to detect and fight infection; screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; evaluate cancer treatment options; and prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. Through real-world cases, students are exposed to a range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics.

 

 


 

PLTW (Project Lead the Way) Engineering Course Descriptions

 


 

Financial Note: In addition to normal book rental, students taking PLTW pre-engineering courses will be required to pay a lab fee of $15 for each course.

Note: The following courses satisfy many Graduation Pathways and are recommended for students who are interested in pursuing a post-secondary degree in an engineering, technology or medical field of study. All courses count as Directed Electives or Electives for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas. Students passing the college portion of the Nation End Course Exam are eligible for trans-scripted college credit through many national universities. 

* = Course qualifies for Dual College Credit through IVY Tech.

 


 

*Introduction to Engineering Design  (IED)  2 semesters, 2 credits 9, 10, 11,12

 

IED is an introductory course that develops student problem solving skills, with emphasis placed on the development of three-dimensional solid models. Students will work from sketching simple geometric shapes to applying a solid modeling computer software package. They will learn a problem solving design process and how it is used in industry to manufacture a product. The Computer Aided Design System (CAD) will also be used to analyze and evaluate the product design. 3D printers will produce student designed products. The techniques learned, and equipment used, are state-of-the-art and are currently being used by engineers throughout the United States. Course qualifies for dual college credit though Ivy Tech. 

Activities Include: Engineer’s Notebook and Design Process, Pencil Sketches, Prototype Construction,   3D CAD Drawings, Precision Measurement, Reverse Engineering, Statistics, Power Points, 3D Printing.

 

 


 

*Digital Electronics (DE)  #5538AB 2 semesters, 2 credits 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite:  It is recommended students passed Alg. 1 with a B- or better.

 

DE is a course of study in applied digital logic. Students will be introduced to digital circuits found in video games, watches, calculators, digital cameras, and thousands of other devices. Students will study the application of digital logic and how digital devices are used to control automated equipment. The use of digital circuitry is present in virtually all aspects of our lives and its use is increasing rapidly. This course is similar to a first semester college course and is an important course of study for a student exploring a career in engineering or engineering technology.  Course qualifies for dual college credit though Ivy Tech.

Activities Include: Electron Theory, Number Systems, Logic Gates and Circuit Design, Binary Adding, Shift Registers and Counters, Microprocessors, Computer Simulated Circuits, and Hardwiring of Digital Circuit Boards.


 

*Principles of Engineering (POE) #5644AB 2 semesters, 2 credits 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design (IED)

 

POE is broad-based course in engineering and engineering technology. Students will develop engineering problem solving and communication skills and apply higher-level mathematics in preparation for post-secondary engineering programs. Topics include: Engineering History and Careers, Creativity and Problem Solving, Energy and Power, Materials and Structures, Control Systems, Statistics and Kinematics.   Course qualifies for dual college credit though Ivy Tech.

Activities Include: Engineering Notebook, Simple Machines and Mechanisms, Basic Electricity, Circuits, Energy and Solar-Hydrogen Vehicle, Thermal Dynamic Testing, Structural Property Analysis of Beams and Trusses, Precision Measurement, Materials Science and Destructive Testing, VEX Automation, Robotics and Programming, Statistics, Kinematics-Ballistics Device, Technical Reports and Power Points. 

 


 

*Civil Engineering & Architecture (CEA) #5650AB 2 semesters, 2 credits 11, 12

Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) and Principles of Engineering (POE)

 

This course provides an overview of the fields of Civil Engineering and Architecture, while emphasizing the interrelationship and dependence of both fields on each other. Students use state-of-the-art software to solve real-world problems and communicate solutions to hands-on projects and activities. The course covers topics such as the roles of civil engineers and architects; project planning; site planning; building design; and project documentation and presentation.

Activities Include: Surveying, Residential Floor Plans, Elevations and Renderings, Electrical/Mechanical Drawings, House Design Prototypes, Commercial Structures, and Topographical Mapping.

 

 


 

*Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM)  #5534AB 2 semesters, 2 credits 11, 12

Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) and Principles of Engineering (POE)

 

This course builds upon the computer solid modeling design skills developed in Introduction to Engineering Design. Students will be presented with design problems that require the use of Inventor to develop solutions to the problems. They will evaluate the solutions using mass property analysis (study of the relationship of design, function, and materials used), make appropriate modifications and use prototyping equipment to produce three-dimensional models of the solutions. Students are expected to communicate the process and results of their work through oral and written reports.

Activities Include: CAD Drawings, CNC Mill, Lathe and Router Projects, Robotic Work Cell Programming and Automation, Manufacturing Cell Design and Simulations, and Precision Measurement.

 

 


 

Engineering Design and Development (EDD)   #5698AB   2 semesters, 2 credits 12

Prerequisite: Completion of IED, POE and one of the following: CIM or CEA or DE.

 

EDD is year-long Project Based Learning (PBL) activity. Students will be involved in four-person teams who research an open-ended problem and then design and construct a solution following the Engineering Design Process.  Each team member must submit progress reports and a final research paper. The team members will defend the solution with a multi-media presentation before an outside engineering review panel. This is the capstone class for the Engineering pathways. 

Activities Include:  Project Research, Timelines, Brainstorming, Development and Optimization, CAD Drawings, Data and Documentation, Testing, Evaluation and Engineering Presentations.

 

 


 

 

Engineering Technology Education (ETE): Course Descriptions

 


 

Robotics     #5610     2 semester, 2 credit                       9, 10, 11, 12

First semester, students will build and autonomously program fully sensor-integrated VEX Clawbot robots.   Using C-based programming, robot behaviors will be optimized to perform a variety of tasks and challenges in the both the virtual and real-world environments. In addition, students will experiment with teleoperation for real-time, human control of the robots.  Second semester students will advance their hands-on and minds-on skills in the investigation, design, fabrication, programming, and testing of robotic systems.  More in-depth topics involve charts and scheduling, robotic subsystems, structure, mechanics and motion, pneumatics, basic electronics, control technologies, computer fundamentals, programmable control technologies, computer applications, and career pathways. Working collaboratively, students will produce a humanoid robot, tethered and in autonomous mode, able to react to specific circumstances and perform human-like tasks when programming is complete.   

Activities Include: Robot Assembly and Configuration, Cortex and Controller Mapping, C-based Programming, Computer Simulations, Various Physical Robotic Challenges, and Sensor Applications, Project Documentation, Scheduling, Planning, Flow Charts, and Presentations.

 

 


 

Advanced Robotics 1   #5612A 2 semesters, 2 credit         10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Robotics and Teacher Signature

 

In this year-long course, students will conduct an in-depth application of robotics principles and automation. Applying the Engineering Design Process, student teams will research, design, fabricate, test, and optimize task oriented robots in a project-based learning environment.  Topics cover robotic principles and theory, applications, design, structure, sensor and actuator interfacing, and C-based robot programming.  Students will use Computer Aided Design (CAD) software to produce robot models.  Teams will communicate project documentation and justify their robotic designs to a panel of engineers.  Members of this class are the core of the school’s award winning, competitive robotics team, the Porta-Botz!  Students are required to after school practices, weekend competitions, fundraising efforts, and the promotion of STEM and Robotics education in the community through mentorship opportunities. 

Activities Include: Engineering Design Process and Documentation, Research and Brainstorming, CAD Drawings, Advanced Robot Design, Fabrication and Applications, Sensor Integration, Autonomous Programming, Driver Control, Engineering Presentations, and Compete in VEX Robotics Tournaments.

 

 


 

Advanced Robotics 2   #5612B 2 semesters, 2 credit       11, 12

Prerequisite: Robotics 1, and Advanced Robotics 1

 

In the capstone course for the Robotics pathway, students will continue on as competitive members of the award winning robotics team.  Students will engage in active learning, critical thinking, and problem solving through advanced robotic procedures and processes. Students will learn to program industrial robots, as well as strategies for improving efficiency through automation. Students will study basic computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining and will combine automation and CNC machining to perform common industrial tasks. In addition, students will also take field trips to local industry and apply knowledge to real world situations to create working solutions. Activities Include: Engineering Design Process and Documentation, Research and Brainstorming, CAD Drawings, Advanced Robot Design, Fabrication, Sensor Integration, Autonomous Programming, CNC Programming, CNC Milling and Routing, Industrial Robotic Arm Applications, and Manufacturing Work Cell Development.

 


 

 

Introduction to Manufacturing    #4784 2 semester, 2 credit 9, 10, 11, 12

 

First semester, students will study the effects of manufacturing on society. Activities include creating production systems, testing materials, designing and producing products, and evaluating manufactured products. Students will explore techniques used to apply technology in obtaining resources and changing them into industrial materials and finished products.  Second semester, students will learn about the process of manufacturing - properties of materials, manufacturing assembly lines, automation principles, and design techniques. Students will design a product, build a prototype of the product, test and evaluate the prototype, and set up an assembly line to produce the product.

Activities Include:  Product Design, Power Machine Use, Jigs and Fixtures, Facility Layout, Mass Production Project, CNC Router Project, CNC Mill Projects, Laser Engraver Project, Manufacturing Flow Charts and Automated Work Cells.

 


 

Introduction to Construction #4792 2 semester, 2 credit 9, 10, 11, 12

 

First semester, students will work individually and in groups studying different kinds of residential, commercial, and industrial building structures. Topics include blueprint reading, writing construction specifications, project estimates, surveying properties, and building foundations and superstructures. Students will explore the applications of tools, materials, and energy used in developing, producing, using, and assessing constructed works. Second semester, students will work as a construction to produce a scaled, model home learning how it relates to construction personnel, the design process, contractual obligations, management systems, construction tools and materials, construction of buildings, purchasing and financing structures, and community planning.

Activities Include: Power Tool Safety and Use, Transit, Levels and Elevations, Foundation, Framing, Electrical, Plumbing, Drywall, Roofing, Interior Finishing and Painting.

 


 

Introduction to Transportation  #4798 2 semester, 2 credit   9, 10, 11, 12

 

In this fast-paced, activity based course, first semester specializes in the study of moving people and goods in the past, present and future. Students will explore vehicular systems used to transport via land, water, air and space emphasizing the principles of operation and societal impacts. Using the Design Process, activities allow students to investigate, understand, design, produce, test and evaluate specific methods of transportation.   Second semester, students will design, construct, test and evaluate several transportation vehicles and technologies.  Students will also study basic aviation and learn to fly a small aircraft with extensive simulator training and an introductory flight at the airport with a pilot. (An additional field trip fee of $75 is necessary.  Students are not required to participate, however.)

Activities Include: Power Point Presentations, Egg Container Drop, CO2 Race Cars, Wind Tunnel Testing, Boat Hulls, Hot Air Balloons, and 2-Liter Water Rockets, Electric Airplanes, Flight Simulation, Piloting Cessna 172, Bridges, Solar Power Car, and Mouse Trap Vehicle and Bridges. 

 


 

Computers in Production and Design #4800 2 semester, 2 credit   9, 10, 11, 12

 

Computers in Design and Production is a year-long course that specializes in using modern technological processes, computers, design, and production systems in the production of products and structures through the use of automated production systems. Emphasis is placed on using modern technologies and on developing career related skills for electronics, manufacturing, precision machining, and architecture career pathways. Topics include: Architectural drawing and print design, design documentation using CAD systems; assignments involving the interface of CAD, CNC, CAM, and CIM technologies; computer simulation of products and systems; publishing of various media; animation and related multimedia applications; 3-D modeling of products or structures; digital creation and editing of graphics and audio files; control technologies; and automation in the modern workplace.

 


 

Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing and Logistics   #4796 2 semester, 2 credit 10, 11,12

Prerequisites: Introduction to Manufacturing

 

Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing and Logistics (CONEXUS 1) focuses on manufacturing systems with an introduction to advanced manufacturing and logistics and their relationship to society, individuals, and the environment. Students apply the skills and knowledge of using modern manufacturing processes to obtain resources and change them into industrial materials, industrial products and consumer products. Students investigate the properties of engineered materials. Students study six major types of material processes: casting and molding; forming; separating; conditioning; finishing; and assembling. After gaining a working knowledge of these materials, Students are introduce to advanced manufacturing, logistics, and business principles that are utilized in today’s advanced manufacturing industry. Students gain a basic understanding of tooling, electrical skills, operation skills, Indiana Department of Education 131 High School Course Titles and Descriptions inventory principles, MSDS’s, chart and graph reading and MSSC concepts. There is also an emphasis placed on the flow process principles, material movement, safety, and related business operations. Students have the opportunity to develop the characteristics employers seek as well as skills that will help them in future endeavors.

 

 


 

Advanced Manufacturing 1   #5608 2 semester, 2 credit 11,12

Prerequisites: Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing and Logistics

 

Advanced Manufacturing I (CONEXUS 2) is a course that includes classroom and laboratory experiences in two broad areas: Industrial Technology/Software Controls and Manufacturing Trends. Domains include safety and impact, electricity, manufacturing essentials, fluid power principals, mechanical principals, lean

manufacturing, and careers in advanced manufacturing. Hands-on projects and team activities will

allow students to apply learning on the latest industry technologies. Students take this course with the

goal of being a skilled machine operator, repair technician, or working in management at any company

that produces goods and services using advanced manufacturing techniques.  A student-led workplace enterprise will be developed and work-based learning experiences and industry partnerships are highly encouraged for an authentic industry experience.

 

 

 

 

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