Family & Consumer Science

Adult Roles & Responsibilities 5330 Adult Roles and Responsibilities is recommended for all students as life foundations and academic enrichment, and as a career sequence course for students with interest in family and community services, personal and family finance, and similar areas. This course builds knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors that students will need as they complete high school and prepare to take the next steps toward adulthood in today’s society. The course includes the study of interpersonal standards, lifespan roles and responsibilities, individual and family resource management, and financial responsibility and resources. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of adult roles and responsibilities. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied. Service learning and other authentic applications are strongly recommended. This course provides the foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to individual and family life.

DOE Code: 5330 • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 10, 11, 12 • Recommended Prerequisites: None • Credits: 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum • This course is one of the six FACS courses from which students may choose three to fulfill the required Health and Safety credit—See Rule 511 IAC 6-7-6 (6) • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas Nutrition & Wellness 5342 Nutrition and Wellness is an introductory course valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers related to nutrition, food, and wellness. This is a nutrition class that introduces students to only the basics of food preparation so they can become self-sufficient in accessing healthy and nutritious foods. Major course topics include nutrition principles and applications; influences on nutrition and wellness; food preparation, safety, and sanitation; and science, technology, and careers in nutrition and wellness. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of nutrition, food, and wellness. Food preparation experiences are a required component. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied. This course is the first in a sequence of courses that provide a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to nutrition, food, and wellness.

DOE Code: 5342 • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 9, 10, 11, 12 • Recommended Prerequisites: None • Credits: 1 credit per semester, maximum of 1 credit • This course is one of the six FACS courses from which students may choose three to fulfill the required Health and Safety credit—See Rule 511 IAC 6-7-6 (6) • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas ADVANCED NUTRITION AND WELLNESS 5340   Advanced Nutrition and Wellness is a course which provides an extensive study of nutrition. This course is recommended for all students wanting to improve their nutrition and learn how nutrition affects the body across the lifespan. Advanced Nutrition and Wellness is an especially appropriate course for students interested in careers in the medical field, athletic training and dietetics. This course builds on the foundation established in Nutrition and Wellness, which is a required prerequisite. This is a project-based course; utilizing higher-order thinking, communication, leadership and management processes. Topics include extensive study of major nutrients, nutritional standards across the lifespan, influences on nutrition/food choices, technological and scientific influences, and career exploration in this field. Laboratory experiences will be utilized to develop food handling and preparation skills; attention will be given to nutrition, food safety and sanitation. This course is the second in a sequence of courses that provide a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to nutrition, food, and wellness. ·

Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 · Recommended Prerequisites: Nutrition and Wellness · Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum · Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas Child Development 5362 Child Development is an introductory course for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers that draw on knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children. This course addresses issues of child development from conception/prenatal through age 3. It includes the study of prenatal development and birth; growth and development of children; child care giving and nurturing; and support systems for parents and caregivers. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of child development. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied. Authentic applications such as introductory laboratory/field experiences with young children and/or service learning that build knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children are strongly recommended. This course provides the foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to children, child development, and nurturing of children.

DOE Code: 5362 • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 9, 10, 11, 12 • Recommended Prerequisites: None • Credits: 1 credit per semester, maximum of 1 credits • This course is one of the six FACS courses from which students may choose three to fulfill the required Health and Safety credit—See Rule 511 IAC 6-7-6 (6) • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas ADVANCED CHILD DEVELOPMENT 5360 Advanced Child Development is for those students interested in life foundations, academic enrichment, and/or careers related to knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children. This course addresses issues of child development from age 4 through age 8 (grade 3). It builds on the Child Development course, which is a prerequisite. Advanced Child Development includes the study of professional and ethical issues in child development; child growth and development; child development theories, research, and best practices; child health and wellness; teaching and guiding children; special conditions affecting children; and career exploration in child development and nurturing. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, Indiana Department of Education 90 High School Course Titles and Descriptions leadership, management, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of child development. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied. Service learning, introductory laboratory/field experiences with children in preschool and early elementary school settings, and other authentic applications are strongly recommended. This course provides a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to children, child development, and nurturing of children.

Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 · Recommended Prerequisites: Child Development · Credits: 1 or 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum · Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas. Introduction To Fashion & Textiles 5380 Introduction to Fashion and Textiles is an introductory course for those students interested in academic enrichment or a career in the fashion, textile, and apparel industry. This course addresses knowledge and skills related to design, production, acquisition, and distribution in the fashion, textile, and apparel arena. The course includes the study of personal, academic, and career success; careers in the fashion, textile, and apparel industry; factors influencing the merchandising and selection of fashion, textile, and apparel goods and their properties, design, and production; and consumer skills. A project-based approach integrates instruction and laboratory experiences including application of the elements and principles of design; selection, production, alteration, repair, and maintenance of apparel and textile products; product research, development, and testing; and application of technical tools and equipment utilized in the industry. Visual arts concepts will be addressed. Direct, concrete mathematics proficiencies will be applied. Service learning and other authentic applications are strongly recommended. This course provides the foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in fashion, textile, and apparel-related careers.

DOE Code: 5380 • Recommended Grade Level: Grade 9, 10, 11, 12 • Recommended Prerequisites: none • Credits: 1 credit per semester, maximum of 2 credits • Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas FASHION AND TEXTILES CAREERS I 5420 (FSHN TXT I) Fashion and Textiles Careers I prepares students for occupations and higher education programs of study related to the entire spectrum of careers in the fashion industry. This course builds a foundation that prepares students to enter the Fashion Careers II course. Major topics include: review of the dimensions of clothing, investigation of design elements and principles, evaluating manufacturing process, reviewing the processes from fiber production to items of clothing being worn, overall review of the textile and apparel industry, investigation of fashion designers, customer relations and best practices, fashion merchandising, forecasting trends, impact of social media on the fashion industry, and career exploration and experience. A project based approach with commercial/industry applications is a key component of this course of study. Student experiences may be either school-based or "on-the-job" or a combination of the two. Work-based experiences in the fashion industry are strongly encouraged. A standards-based plan guides the students’ experiences. This course is a core component of four-year career plansforthe career clusters of Personal & Commercial Services; Manufacturing & Processing; and Art, A/V Technology & Communications. It is recommended for students with interests in apparel, textiles, and fashion career pathways and provides the foundation for continuing study. Students are monitored in their experiences by the Fashion Careers I teacher. Articulation with postsecondary programs is encouraged.

Recommended Grade Level:10, 11, 12 · Recommended Prerequisites: Preparing for College and Careers; Introduction to Fashion and Textiles Foundations, Entrepreneurship and Marketing courses · Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum · Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas HOUSING AND INTERIOR DESIGN CAREERS I 5352 (HIDC I) Housing and Interior Design Careers I prepares students for occupations and higher education programs of study related to the entire spectrum of career clusters that encompass careers related to housing, interiors, and furnishings. Topics include commercial applications of principles of design to creating aesthetic and functional residential and commercial environments; human, non-human, community, family, and financial resources for housing; housing and interiors materials and products; client-centered designing, drafting, blue printing, and space planning; rendering, elevations, and sketching; historical, technological, and environmental impacts on housing and interiors; zoning, building codes, regulations, and accessibility guidelines, and their impact on housing related outcomes. Ethical, legal, and safety issues as well as helping processes and collaborative ways of working with others are to be addressed. Intensive laboratory experiences with commercial applications are a required component of this course of study. Work based experiences in the housing, interiors, and/or furnishings industries are strongly encouraged.

Recommended Grade Level: 11, 12 · Recommended Prerequisites: Preparing for College and Careers, Introduction to Housing and Interior Design · Credits: 2 semester course, 2 semesters required, 1-3 credits per semester, 6 credits maximum · Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas INTRODUCTION TO HOUSING AND INTERIOR DESIGN 5350 (INT HSINT DES) Introduction to Housing and Interior Design is an introductory course essential for those students interested in academic enrichment or a career within the housing, interior design, or furnishings industry. This course addresses the selection and planning of designed spaces to meet the needs, wants, values and lifestyles of individuals, families, clients, and communities. Housing decisions, resources and options will be explored including factors affecting housing choices and the types of housing available. Developmental influences on housing and interior environments will also be considered. Basic historical architectural styling and basic furniture styles will be explored as well as basic identification of the elements and principles of design. Design and space planning involves evaluating floor plans and reading construction documents while learning to create safe, functional, and aesthetic spaces. Presentation techniques will be practiced to thoroughly communicate design ideas. Visual arts concepts including aesthetics, criticism, history and production, are addressed. Direct, concrete mathematics proficiencies will be applied. A project based approach will be utilized requiring higher-order thinking, communication, leadership and management processes as housing and interior design content is integrated into the design of interior spaces while meeting specific project criteria. This course provides the foundation for further study and careers in the architecture, construction, housing, interior design, and furnishings industries.

Recommended Grade Level: 9,10, 11, 12 · Recommended Prerequisites: none · Credits: 1-2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum · Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas · Fulfills a Fine Arts requirement for the Core 40 Academic Honors Diploma HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND WELLNESS 5366 (HUMAN DEV) Human Development and Wellness is valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers impacted by individuals’ physical, social, emotional, and moral development and wellness across the lifespan. Major topics include principles of human development and wellness; impacts of family on human development and wellness; factors that affect human development and wellness; practices that promote human development and wellness; managing resources and services related to human development and wellness; and career exploration in human development and wellness. Life events and contemporary issues addressed in this course include (but are not limited to) change; stress; abuse; personal safety; and relationships among lifestyle choices, health and wellness conditions, and diseases. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is Indiana Department of Education 99 High School Course Titles and Descriptions recommended in order to integrate the study of these topics. Authentic applications through service learning are encouraged.

Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 · Recommended Prerequisites: none · Credits: 1-2 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 2 credits maximum · Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas · Qualifies as one of the F&CS courses a student can take to waive the Health & Wellness graduation requirement. To qualify for the Health and Wellness waiver, a student must take three of the approved courses. For more information, see 511 IAC6-7.1-4(c)(6). INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS 5364 (IPR) Interpersonal Relationships is an introductory course that is especially relevant for students interested in careers that involve interacting with people. It is also valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment. This course addresses knowledge and skills needed for positive and productive relationships in career, community, and family settings. Major course topics include communication skills; leadership, teamwork, and collaboration; conflict prevention, resolution, and management; building and maintaining relationships; and individual needs and characteristics and their impacts on relationships. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of interpersonal relationships. Direct, concrete language arts proficiencies will be applied. Service learning and other authentic applications are strongly recommended. This course provides a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education for all career areas that involve interacting with people both inside and outside of a business/organization, including team members, clients, patients, customers, and the general public.

Recommended Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 · Recommended Prerequisites:none · Credits: 1 semester course, 1 credit per semester, 1 credit maximum · Counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for all diplomas; local programs have the option of offering a second version of the course that is focused more on family relations. Such a course may be differentiated from the regular course offering by using a subtitle in addition to Interpersonal Relationships. A student may earn credits for both versions of the course. No waiver is required in this instance. Indiana Department of Education 100 High School Course Titles and Descriptions · Qualifies as one of the F&CS courses a student can take to waive the Health & Wellness graduation requirement. To qualify for the Health and Wellness waiver, a student must take three of the approved courses. For more information, see 511 IAC6-7.1-4(c)(6).


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